Sunday, September 29, 2013

Bittersweet


Bittersweet is always a sign of Autumn for me. My first introduction to bittersweet was when I was a guest at someone's house over the Thanksgiving holiday. The house was a beautiful antique Cape decorated with exquisite artwork and fine antiques. 

Against the formality of the interiors and of the beautiful appointed Thanksgiving table, bittersweet draped the dining room fireplace mantle. Its simplicity was graceful and elegant. It taught me how the simplest of things, especially in nature, can be the most breathtaking. 

42 comments :

  1. How lovely - I didn't know that is what this was called.
    It looks pretty shaped in to a wreath.

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  2. I live in Texas and we can't grow it here. In the past I've been lucky to get it from vendors coming to the Round Top antiques fair, but I was there the last two days and neither of the vendors that bring it were there. I'm going to have to see if I may be able to order some online. That wreath is lovely.

    Smiles,

    Carol

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  3. The bittersweet wreath against the old blue door is stunning. I love bittersweet. I have not seen it around where I live recently. My grandmother in Kansas always had it in her home and would share some with my Mother.

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  4. I love bittersweet! It's definitely one of those "signs of Autumn".

    Tim

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  5. Beautiful. It is often hard to find here. It too reminds me of fall.

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  6. The orange against the blue door is breathtaking. Sara, Ohio

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  7. Bittersweet is one of my very favorite things about fall. I passed the farmers market yesterday and saw bunches of it hanging from the barn rafters already.

    I'm glad you're posting again and I truly love the new name of your blog. It has a daydreamy feel to it. :)

    Sarah

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  8. That is just gorgeous...and against the blue, breathtaking. I too love nature's offerings and use what I gather, but don't have bittersweet here.

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  9. Oh my, I thought I was a dying breed of Bittersweet liking. It is scarce in our part of the state due to the routine "weed" spraying by the highway transportation. I have managed to get it growing on our property and as of this weekend it now is a shade of beautiful mustard gold. A good first frost and the magnificent shade of orange will emerge.

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  10. It does just that added extra touch. Beautiful color!
    Brenda

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  11. A gorgeous plant to be sure. Nice to see you. Hope the family is doing well. Kit

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  12. Bittersweet was my father's favorite. He planted a vine that in time wrapped up and around two porches that he and my mom had at their home.

    Planting Bittersweet was one of the first things I did when I moved into my new home 23 years ago. The vine twists and turns like my father's did . . . up and around a huge oak tree in our back yard.

    Thank you for stirring my memories. Your beautiful bittersweet wreath brings the season into full bloom.

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  13. Beautiful! I love the simplicity of it, and the color against the aqua-colored door.

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  14. I love bittersweet too and make wreaths of it every fall...just beautiful in the fall!

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  15. I love the look of Bittersweet but I never find any in my area.


    Looking forward to hearing more about your new adventure.

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  16. I love bittersweet. I make a wreath of it every year at this time too. Beautiful time of year.

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  17. The bittersweet makes a beautiful wreath. Valerie

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  18. I love bittersweet and pumpkins -- the perfect decoration for fall.

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  19. I love bittersweet, and am looking forward to going out and picking some in the next month. And I'm wondering if this is a clue as to what coast you are on? I love seeing a post up from you. Like the new name! Donna :)

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  20. We were in Maine for the weekend and saw bittersweet wreaths for sale and also on display in shops etc. It's a beautiful natural vine and perfect for fall but we don't have it up here in New Brunswick, that I know of. Your wreath is lovely. Enjoy!

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  21. please be careful with the little ones..it is deadly poisonous! Every part of it.

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  22. Dear Doda,
    Thank you for telling me. We don't have any in the house but if we do, I will be very careful with it. Thanks again for letting me know!
    Best,
    Catherine

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  23. Bittersweet brings back many childhood memories. My grandmother used it to decorate, every Fall and into Christmas, as well.

    The wreath is beautiful!

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  24. I too love it for fall decorating, but in nature (at least in VA, NJ, and Cape Cod, places I garden) it is horribly invasive! I rip it out by the wheelbarrowfuls all summer long!

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  25. http://landscaping.about.com/cs/groundcovervines1/a/bittersweet.htm this might be helpful!

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  26. "Bittersweet" is very symbolic to me.
    pve

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  27. I love bittersweet but have never seen it growing. I do have some faux bittersweet-it just screams fall to me. Thanks for sharing.
    Hugs, Noreen

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  28. So lovely. I also love the contrast with the door color.
    Lovely missy!
    xoxo
    Lisa
    Leeshideaway

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  29. I love the simple elegance of bittersweet - one of my favorites for fall decorating!

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  30. Oh...it is quintessential! But, alas, we don't see it down here. (except at the market for 14 bucks a stick!)

    Beautiful image!

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  31. Never heard of Bittersweet, but it so pretty.

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  32. I was so inspired by your post that I have searched for a nursery that will sell/ship bare root bittersweet stock...what a lovely image!

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  33. Hi - I'm new to your blog and ADORE it. I'm having fun scrolling through old posts and pictures. Really beautiful - I'm a new follower!

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  34. Hi Catherine - I really like this post and love following your blog. I have always found it to be calming and inspirational. I am a floral designer and wildcrafter who LOVES bittersweet too!
    Sally
    naturaldeisgnsstudio.com

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  35. We were stationed at Hanscom and would wait for the first few crisp nights of fall...I think the cool weather actually prompts them to "open"...we'd climb the hill behind our house on base and harvest our own bittersweet...it grew wild along with Concord grapes...right there on Rt 2a...I sure miss both of those things :)

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  36. Its so perfect for this time of year, dont think we get it in Scotland though xx

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  37. Bittersweet is an invasive vine that threatens many trees and forests in the Northeast. It is illegal to plant or cultivate in many parts of New England.

    Just say no to Bittersweet decorations!!!

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  38. I would like clear up the thoughts about "invasiveness" and bittersweet. There are two varieties: American and Oriental. The latter is invasive and illegal to market. The former is fine. Both are toxic to eat.

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